UK police force builds up non-lethal capabilities

The British police force is building up a huge stockpile of Tasers which cost £150,000 in the last nine months alone - despite using the controversial weapon just once in eight years. Anti-weapon campaigners have condemned the spend by the Military of Defence police, which has had to cut millions of pounds from its budget and sack 800 officers - a quarter of the workforce - since 2010. For Market Research Report on “Non-Lethal Weapons Market” Visit – Reportedly, the force which guards military bases around Britain, spent £361,185 on 363 Tasers since the weapons were introduced in 2007. Some 217 of those, almost two thirds of the entire stock, were bought since April 2013 after police inspectors said they should become commonplace.   A Taser was discharged on a suspect just once, during an incident in 2011 which was not within the force's normal remit. Seven Tasers were aimed using a ‘red dot’ laser sight, and the remaining five were drawn but not aimed. Not a single Taser was drawn from its holster in 2013. Those figures could now fall even further after Home Secretary Theresa May called for the use of Tasers to be reviewed amid claims they are used too much on vulnerable people. A report found 30 per cent of people Tasered in London in 2011 had mental health issues - and half were from ethnic minorities. Concerns have however cropped up over the effect of even such non-lethal weapons of people with mental disorders and health issues. The X26-series weapons currently cost £1,050 each and are made by the U.S. firm Taser International in a 100,000 sq ft complex in Scottsdale, Arizona. They are already common in U.S. police forces and the firm, whose motto is ‘Protect Life. Protect Truth’, claims they have ‘transformed law enforcement and become a vital tool’. But despite bringing down injury rates in U.S. states where they are used instead of guns, the weapons have been at the centre of several scandals. Non-Lethal Weapons Market Source: Radiant Insights